What Camera do I need for Landscape Photography?

Check out any of the many social media or photography websites, and it won’t take long for you to realize that the landscape category is by far the most popular, perhaps because of how accessible it is. Contrary to popular belief, today almost any point-and-shoot camera or smartphone will allow you to take exceptional landscape photos.

However, these cameras lack the versatility and features you’ll need to improve as a landscape photographer. That is why most of the enthusiast and professional photographers opt for cameras with a SLR or Mirrorless system.

But what is the best camera for landscape photography? Unfortunately there is no simple answer to this question. Each camera is a compromise between positives and negatives, and it falls to each one to weigh those pros and cons to arrive at the best possible decision.

In this article, we’ll go over the features and functionality that make a camera ideal for landscape photography, which specs are the most important to consider, which ones you can do without, and what mistakes to avoid before deciding.

Brand.

I sincerely believe that all brands offer great products, even so, my first piece of advice would be to carefully study which brand you are going to marry. And yes, I say marry because photographic equipment is a great investment, which you acquire over time. As you grow as a photographer, so do your needs.

Once you buy your first camera, you will generally be tied to that brand, since all future purchases you make will be for that specific camera and brand.

Selling your photographic equipment to start with another brand is usually a difficult and very expensive process. The reasons can be several, but generally it is because the brand does not offer what you need or because the competition has products that better fit your needs. That is why you should study carefully what each one offers, if they cover your present and future needs, and especially if they are a safe bet in the long term.

Full Frame Vs APS-C

There is and has been for a long time an ongoing debate on this issue. As a general rule, a larger sensor will have a higher dynamic range and higher ISO performance, especially in low light conditions.

While it is true that in some respects APS-C sensors are increasingly offering similar quality to full frame cameras, it is also true that full frame cameras are becoming more competitive on price, evening the scales.

If your budget allows it, I personally recommend a full frame camera, since the advantages it offers over APS-C cameras make them more suitable for landscape photography.

Competition is fierce, and manufacturers strive to constantly bring new products to market. Often times, today’s camera doesn’t offer much more performance than the model it replaces. If the budget is a factor to take into account, I advise you to buy a camera of a previous generation. On many occasions it will offer you more or less the same thing at a lower price.

Lenses.

A very important consideration before deciding on a specific camera, are the objectives that you will use with it, especially those mentioned in this article: “the 3 essential objectives for landscape photography”.

The quality of the lenses often has more of an impact on the quality of the final photo than the camera body itself. Make sure that the brand of the camera that you are going to buy also has the objectives that you will need and that these fit with your budget.

Reflex Vs Mirrorless.

Each one has its advantages and disadvantages, but this topic is for a separate complete article. Without going into too many details and with the current market situation, I personally recommend a Mirrorless system. Not because they are necessarily better, but because it is the system that brands are betting on and investing more in, making this system a much safer investment in the medium and long term.

Megapixeles.

Another of the great debates in the world of photography, and that can create confusion. There is a lot of information on this topic, but I think there is also a lot of misinformation, which can lead to misconceptions.

Yes, a camera with many megapixels will have a higher definition and dynamic range, so the details will be exquisite and it will have an advantage in scenes with a lot of contrast. But also by having more megapixels packed into a sensor of the same size, these pixels are smaller, so they perform worse in low light and high ISO conditions. Also, if you want to take full advantage of that higher resolution, you’ll have to pair your camera with lenses with more refined optics, and therefore much more expensive.

The question you have to ask yourself is, what use are you going to give to your photos?

If you are going to print your photos with an A3+ size (32x48cm), display them on your website or upload them to social networks, 24 megapixels are more than enough, and it is also considered today as an ideal point. You won’t notice the difference between 24 and 40 megapixels unless you zoom in to 100% in Lightroom and check every single pixel.

Where you will notice the increase in megapixels is if you are going to print your photos in much larger formats such as A1 (60x84cm) or A0 (84x119cm), if you are going to crop the images a lot in post-processing (which is not necessary if you compose well), or you dedicate yourself professionally to photography and you are going to cover the investment with your work.

Also keep in mind that this higher number of megapixels affects other areas. For example, the files will weigh much more, so memory cards and hard drives must have greater capacity. The computer you use should also be more powerful when handling larger files. Lightroom and Photoshop can suffer a lot, so the experience can be frustrating if you don’t have a powerful computer.

Dynamic Range.

One of the most important qualities in a camera is its dynamic range, but it is an aspect that is not usually paid as much attention.

The dynamic range is the range of tones that your camera’s sensor is capable of capturing, from the lightest tone (white) to the darkest (black). Dynamic range is measured in EV steps, and the higher the number, the more dynamic range you will capture.

When shooting, this means your camera is able to pick up more shadows and highlights, which is very important in landscape photography, especially when the scene is high in contrast. If you go outside the dynamic range, the image will be pure black or white, with the consequent loss of information.

Iso.

The ISO allows you to adjust the sensitivity of the sensor to light. As you increase the ISO value, you also increase the exposure, but as a consequence you add digital noise to the image, losing sharpness and quality. That is why, as a general rule, in landscape photography you will always photograph with the base ISO value, that is, the lowest that the camera allows.

For general use, your camera should not shine in this section. But if your priority is night photography, northern lights or the milky way, you will benefit greatly if your camera performs well at high ISO values.

Autofocus.

Generally, in landscape photography you will have more than enough time to compose and focus the scene calmly. As long as your camera has a reliable and consistent autofocus is more than enough, it is not worth investing in a camera with ultra-fast autofocus.

FPS.

They are the initials for frames per second, and it is the capacity of your camera to capture in bursts. In other words, if your camera has 8 FPS, it means that it can capture 8 consecutive images per second (until the buffer is full). It is a feature that does not work in landscape photography in the vast majority of cases, so nothing happens if your camera has low FPS.

Weather Resistance.

Harsh weather conditions keep most people indoors, but for landscape photographers these are unique moments to capture incredible images. It is worth investing in this section and that your camera is built with durable materials and is suitable to withstand the elements. Each manufacturer names it in a way and it can be confusing; “weather sealed”, “dust and moisture resistant”, etc. Check the manufacturer’s data sheet and what it guarantees exactly.

Articulated screen.

The articulating screen is one of those features that you can’t live without once you try it. Achieving a good composition often involves positioning your camera at unusual angles. An articulating screen will allow you to compose the scene with ease and much more flexibility.

Ergonomics.

Manufacturers spend a lot of time and effort designing cameras that are ergonomically suitable, but how it fits in your hand is up to the individual. As with clothing, you should try it on first to see if it fits you. The same thing happens with cameras; Does it fit well in your hands? Can you hold it firmly? Is the button layout adequate? How about the weight and volume? These are important questions and that you can only answer once you have tried it, so go to the nearest store and see for yourself.

RAW Format.

The RAW format is an image file that contains all the data captured by the sensor. This format collects all the information without loss, so it offers a lot of flexibility and quality when it comes to post-processing the image.

All modern cameras record in RAW format, just make sure your camera has it, you know it’s there, and always shoot in this format.

Sensations.

So far we have gone over all the technical details, specifications and features that make a camera ideal for landscape photography. But there’s one more feature that’s often overlooked: How does your camera make you feel?

At first glance, it may seem like a ridiculous question, since the camera is simply a tool that allows you to take photos, but in my opinion, a good camera is much more than that. The best camera for you is a camera that makes you feel amazing, a camera that makes you want to take a picture every time you see it!

Find a camera you’re passionate about, and you won’t want to leave home without it!

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Compatible on all devices (Windows, Android, iOS), and the free Lightoom Mobile app, Lightroom Classic and ACR.

What Camera do I need for Landscape Photography?

Each camera is a world, and choosing the one that best suits you is not an easy task. Learn about all the features and functionality that make a camera ideal for landscape photography.


The 3 Essential Lenses for Landscape Photography

As a landscape photographer, lenses are possibly the most important items in your kit. Discover which are the 3 essentials, and what characteristics or not, you should look for to invest your money…


7 essential habits to improve as a landscape photographer

All successful photographers share certain habits in common. Adopt these 7 essential habits to boost your effectiveness and increase your chances of capturing memorable images.



The 3 Essential Lenses for Landscape Photography

Landscape photography is a genre that spans a multitude of different styles, from up close and intimate images to sweeping panoramas. In order to cover all your needs, you must have the right equipment.

Lenses are possibly the most important piece of equipment to consider, perhaps even more so than the camera itself. You will change the camera from time to time, good objectives are forever.

Much of the cost of photographic equipment will go towards lenses, so choose carefully before deciding which one to buy. There is a huge offering on the market and it is easy to get lost with so many specifications and terminology, especially if you are just starting out.

In this article we will analyze the 3 objectives that you will need as a landscape photographer and will give you the necessary advice to decide and invest your money wisely.

Prime vs Zoom.

Fixed focal lenses for landscape photography are highly impractical. By not having a zoom, they will greatly limit the composition. You should have many, many prime lenses to meet your needs, and you usually don’t even need the advantages that prime lenses offer. The large diaphragm opening and the greater definition that they usually offer do not counteract their impracticality.

A mistake that is made with this type of lens is to think that you can zoom simply by changing your position, and this in landscape photography is completely wrong. If you zoom in or out of your subject, you are completely changing the perspective of the scene, while if you zoom in, you are cutting the field of view by changing the focal length.

In addition, many times it is impossible to physically approach or move away from the subject for the simple reason that the terrain where you are prevents you from doing so.

Diaphragm Aperture

There are some exceptions, but generally in landscape photography you will use an aperture of F8 to F11 to have a greater depth of field, and it is also in this aperture range that the subjects are sharpest.

If we do not take into account astrophotography and the northern lights, this means that the 3 essential lenses you need for landscape photography should not be bright, which will save you a lot of money, weight and volume.

To give you an idea, a lens with a constant aperture of F2.8 on average usually weighs and measures 35% more, and costs twice as much as one with an F4.0 aperture. It makes no sense to invest that money and carry the extra weight and volume if you are not going to take advantage of it.

Image Stabilizer

Personally I prefer lenses to have an image stabilizer. However, most modern cameras already incorporate the stabilizer in the body, and some brands even allow both stabilizers to work together.

In the vast majority of cases you will photograph with a tripod, but there are cases in which the stabilizer will come in handy, so I recommend having it on at least one of the two (lens or camera). It will be very useful if you have to shoot handheld and even if it is mounted on the tripod and there is a lot of wind, especially when using a telephoto lens.

Weather Resistance.

Shooting landscapes means that you will spend most of your time outdoors, under all kinds of weather conditions. To avoid possible damage, make sure your lens is sealed with gaskets on its moving parts, and is constructed of durable materials.

Autofocus.

Although landscape photography is a rather slow genre, investing in autofocus lenses is worth it. There are just times when focusing manually can be tedious, for example when shooting handheld.

The landscapes have hardly any movement, so you don’t need the latest technology in focus systems. A consistent and precise autofocus will be more than enough.

Focal Distance.

I’m going to be talking in full format terms, so if you’re using an APS-C or Micro 4/3 system you’ll need to take into account the crop factor of your system:

SONY/NIKON APS-C: 1.5

CANON APS-C: 1.6

MICRO 4/3: 2

Wide Angle | Ultra Wide Angle.

It is the most popular lens for landscape photography and it is for less. The reason they are so revered is because of their focal range, which ranges from 12mm to 35mm. This wide range of vision allows you to capture images with a perspective that the human eye is not used to seeing, resulting in unusual and impressive images. That is why they are considered an essential lens for any landscape photographer.

Also, wide lenses are excellent at conveying depth, which means you’ll get consistently sharp images, from foreground to background, something we almost always look for in landscape photography.

The big question when purchasing this lens is to decide on a wide angle or an ultra wide angle. Each one has its advantages and disadvantages.

Depending on your brand, you will normally find the following options:

ULTRA WIDE ANGLE: 11-24mm, 14-24mm or the most common 14-24mm.

WIDE ANGLE: 15-30mm, 17-40mm, the most common being 16-35mm.

In the wide-angle lens you can attach filters, even screw-in ones that minimize camera movement when placing them. They are also more versatile as they have a longer focal range, allowing you more flexibility when composing.

The big advantage of the ultra wide angle is those extra 2mm in its shortest focal range. It may not seem like much, but those extra millimeters make a big difference in the real world. On the other hand, these objectives have a convex front element, so filters cannot be easily adapted. There are specific filter holder systems for these objectives, but they are large, heavy and very expensive, so I do not recommend them. Also its shorter focal range makes it less versatile and you will have to swap lenses more often.

Standard Zoom.

As the name indicates, this zoom is considered the standard lens in the photographic world. Ranging from 24 to 70mm, it is possibly the most versatile lens of all. It provides a field of view similar to the human eye, and as such, can create more realistic and pleasing images.

At 24mm it’s wide enough to get glorious views with a more natural composition, and at 70mm you’re entering short telephoto territory, giving you enough focal length to play with composition and focus more on detail.

Luckily it’s easier to choose in the range of standard zoom lenses. Here the big debate is between choosing a 24-70mm or a 24-105mm. The 24-70mm is usually available with a constant F2.8 aperture, but as I mentioned at the beginning of this article, it’s not a necessity for landscape photography. Another advantage is usually a greater definition by having a smaller focal range, but this varies depending on the objective and brand.

The main advantage of the 24-105mm is obviously that extra 35mm of focal range, which makes it an even more versatile lens.

Telephoto | Super-Telephoto.

These lenses are generally more associated with wildlife photography, although they definitely have a place in landscape photography as well, and can enhance your photography by seeing the world in a different way. Its long focal range allows you to dissect and isolate details of the landscape such as lines, patterns, textures or silhouettes, giving rise to more abstract images, adding variety to your portfolio. They are also an excellent option for excluding much of the landscape when the light is not good, or when the scene lacks interest in the foreground.

The typical range of a telephoto lens is usually between 70 and 200mm, and the super telephoto lens goes up to 300, 400 and even 600mm. Generally the 70-200mm range is sufficient, but some people prefer 70-300 or 100-400 to have even more range.

70-200mm lenses tend to have more definition than a 70-300mm or 100-400mm, although that always depends on the specific brand and lens. Also the 100-400mm tend to be much more expensive and heavier, although the offer on the market is always growing and there are excellent options at competitive prices.

Resume:

  • Fixed focal lenses are not practical for landscape photography.
  • Do not invest in bright lenses, a maximum aperture of F4 is sufficient.
  • Get lenses with a stabilizer if your camera doesn’t have one.
  • The construction and tightness of the lens are very important.
  • You don’t need ultra-fast focusing lenses.
  • Consider the crop factor if you are using an APS-C or Micro 4/3 camera.
  • If you opt for an ultra-wide angle lens, check first what filter system you can use, perhaps a wide angle is more convenient for you.
  • As for the combinations, any of these options will cover all your needs, so that the team is not the factor that sets your limits:

14-24mm + 24-70mm + 70-200mm. This combination is known in the photographic world as “the holy trinity”, and it is the most common combination. (A variant would be to change the telephoto lens for a 70-300mm).
16-35mm + 24-105mm + 100-400mm is also a very interesting alternative, if you opt for a longer standard zoom.

Conclusion:

Every photographer has their own style, which means the concept of the best lens for landscape photography will vary depending on your needs.

If you’re just starting out and you’re still unclear on your style, I advise you to practice with whatever camera and lens you have on hand. With time and practice, you will find that you start to gravitate more towards a certain style, and then you will know what your needs are.

I hope this article has been helpful to you, and it clears up your doubts about what each objective offers and what qualities, or not, you should look for in them. If you have any other questions, or you liked the article, do not hesitate to leave me a comment

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Compatible on all devices (Windows, Android, iOS), and the free Lightoom Mobile app, Lightroom Classic and ACR.

What Camera do I need for Landscape Photography?

Each camera is a world, and choosing the one that best suits you is not an easy task. Learn about all the features and functionality that make a camera ideal for landscape photography.


The 3 Essential Lenses for Landscape Photography

As a landscape photographer, lenses are possibly the most important items in your kit. Discover which are the 3 essentials, and what characteristics or not, you should look for to invest your money…


7 essential habits to improve as a landscape photographer

All successful photographers share certain habits in common. Adopt these 7 essential habits to boost your effectiveness and increase your chances of capturing memorable images.



7 essential habits to improve as a landscape photographer

Photographing landscapes is a unique opportunity to reconnect with myself. I become so absorbed that I can forget everything except the present moment, without worries or distractions. I wish it was always like this, but to be honest, it’s not always the case.

There are many factors to take into account to achieve the image you so desire, and sometimes it can be stressful to find the ideal composition, adjust the camera, predict how the light will influence your image and be prepared for when it happens. In addition, there are factors that you cannot control, such as the weather, that can ruin everything.

If you want to get consistent results and above all not lose or ruin a unique opportunity, incorporate these 7 habits into your work routine.

01. Know your camera like the back of your hand.

Although it is true that landscape photography is a rather slow genre, it is also true that weather conditions are very changeable, and on many occasions the perfect light that we so long for lasts only a few minutes or sometimes even seconds.

When this happens, you’ll need to adapt to those changing conditions quickly, and the last thing you want is to miss out because you can’t remember exactly how to set up your camera, or how to access the necessary settings.

If you don’t already know your camera well, start by reading the instruction manual. It may seem obvious, but you’d be surprised how many photographers I know who haven’t read the manual, and are therefore unaware of some features of their camera. Some options are quite hidden within the menu, and others may not be clear what they are for.

Reading the instructions of your camera carefully will solve all these doubts and will make you much more familiar with your camera. Focus on those sections that offer information about features you don’t know about, and how to quickly access all the essential settings. Take notes and mark the most important pages of the manual so you can return to them if necessary.

By default, each button on your camera will have a function assigned to it by default, but most modern cameras offer the ability to customize those buttons to whatever function you want. The flexibility that this feature offers is extremely useful.

Assign the most useful functions to the customizable buttons, and you will have access to them with the press of a button. Setting it up can be a tedious task, but the manual will guide you through the process. Once you have done so, you will have a camera customized to your liking and needs, which will significantly improve the user experience and speed of use.

Practice with your camera over and over again to the point that you can operate it without looking at it. Basically, your camera should become an extension of your hand.

Learning this habit will help you tremendously when you go out shooting. It will make you feel much more comfortable and in control of the situation, and what is more important, you will be able to devote all your attention to studying the scene and react quickly to any circumstance.

02. Monitor the weather

Light and how it influences your image is surely the most important factor to take into account in photography. As a landscape photographer, you will generally always shoot at sunrise or sunset, when the light is more diffuse.

However, the weather plays a fundamental role, and has a direct impact on the light conditions that you will be able to obtain. Although it seems obvious, many photographers do not take weather conditions into account when preparing their photographic outings.

If you want to increase your chances of success, download a weather app and learn how to use it. Learn to anticipate when the clouds will arrive at the location you are photographing, and if possible, what type. Predict if there is going to be a storm and how long it can last, or if the sky will be completely clear, or overcast most of the time.

Having this information in advance will help you decide which location to choose, or be more prepared for what awaits you. Perhaps you decide to go to a different location than you had planned, or perhaps look for a different composition to add drama, in case it is a stormy day, for example.

In countries like Iceland or Norway, the weather is usually very changeable. It may be completely covered, with rain and fog, and in half an hour it will be completely clear. Check your weather radar beforehand to decide if it is worth waiting, or changing locations.

Don’t wait until you’re in the middle of a photographic journey to learn how to use the app. Get used to using it from home, and practice with the local time.

Arrive first, leave the last.

Do you want to become a successful landscape photographer? Great, but keep in mind that you are going to have to make sacrifices to become it. You will have to get up at painful hours to arrive before dawn, or stay out in the open when the others are already having dinner.

It still amazes me to be completely alone in one location, to see most photographers arrive right at sunset, set the camera in almost any position, and leave soon after, as soon as the sun has set, or even before, when the weather conditions are not good.

Arriving early allows you to explore the area in search of the ideal composition. Once you’re satisfied, you can place your camera on the tripod, fine-tune the composition even further, and make any necessary camera adjustments based on the needs of the scene. Having enough time is the only guarantee of being able to do everything correctly.

The landscapes change constantly depending on the light. What is now a cloudy sky, can be a dreamy sunset a few minutes later. What seems to be a failure can become a success if you wait to see how things develop. This perseverance will take you further than most photographers and you will get unique images more often. There’s no telling when mother nature might surprise you!

An added advantage to the habit of arriving first and leaving last, is that you have the possibility of taking two completely different images of the same location. It seems that almost all landscape photographers focus on the golden hour (when the sun is close to the horizon), but there is much more before and after that, and it’s called the blue hour.

The blue hour is a magical moment that many photographers overlook, and one that you should certainly take advantage of. The blue hour occurs just before sunrise, or after sunset, when the sky is completely blue. You usually have 30-45 minutes to capture this magical blue light, before the sky explodes with colour.

These two images were taken in the same location, the first at sunset, and the second about 40 minutes later on a nearby hill. Two completely different spectacular images, even though I took them in the same location in the span of 1 hour or so.

04. Get inspired by other photographers.

Are you going to photograph a new location that you don’t know and don’t know where to start? It’s completely normal. If you haven’t been before, how would you know?

There’s nothing wrong with checking out other photographers’ portfolios, where you can discover new locations and find inspiration. What’s more, in my opinion it is a completely normal practice that most photographers use.

I’m not saying that you should trace the work of other photographers, but use it as a guide to discover new places and above all get inspired. If you are just starting out and want to be a successful photographer, you should look at what other successful photographers are doing and see how they can help you grow.

Fortunately we live in the digital age, and you have a vast selection of websites where you can find an infinite amount of information, from my own website or from other photographers, social networks, or books.

Don’t forget to socialize with other photographers when you’re on the road. It usually happens by itself, as we share a common passion. Keeping in touch with these new friends and sharing information is a great way to grow as a photographer.

05. Keep your equipment clean.

Cleaning your gear might be the least exciting task as a photographer, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t do it often, especially as a landscape photographer.

When you return home from a photography trip, it’s easy to get carried away with excitement, and the first thing we usually do is take out the card from our camera to import and review the images, while we select the best ones to process.

With all this excitement, it’s easy to forget that your precious equipment has been subjected to harsh conditions of all kinds, such as dust, water, salt spray and dirt of all kinds that can affect the operation of your equipment.

A cleaning kit of one of the 7 essential accessories for landscape photography, and it should always be in your bag when you go on a trip to keep your equipment operational and in good condition.

Get in the habit of doing a deep cleaning of all your equipment when you return home. Make sure that no trace of dust or dirt remains on your camera, lenses or filters before storing it back in your bag.

Also check the sensor, and if dust has entered, clean it with some sensor cleaning swabs. If you don’t dare yourself, take your camera from time to time to a technical service to have it cleaned for you. If you have specks of dust on the sensor, these will be seen in all your photos.

A constant cleaning of your equipment will prevent the accumulation of dust and dirt that can reach the sensor. Preventive maintenance is essential for your equipment to perform at its best.

06. Review your images.

Have you ever photographed a scene with perfect conditions, and you think you’ve captured one of your best images, only to realize later that you shot the image at a very high ISO when it wasn’t necessary? Or perhaps you have not focused correctly and part of your image is not sharp?

Perhaps you are tired after several days and do not pay due attention, perhaps you have accidentally touched the focus of the lens, or when inserting a filter. Perhaps you have changed the settings for particular conditions, or for an artistic purpose, and have forgotten to reset it later. Or maybe it was a simple oversight…

There can be many reasons, but unfortunately these kinds of errors do happen, and they can ruin a unique image. To avoid this, make it a habit to review the image preview and make sure that the image is correctly exposed and that the settings are correct. Enlarge the preview and check in detail if the image is well focused and everything is clear. You will avoid more than one upset!

07. Keep your backpack in order.

The backpack is one of the 7 essential accessories for landscape photography, and the organization within it is essential if you want to be an efficient photographer.

First of all, photographic equipment is usually expensive and delicate. Cameras, lenses, remote triggers, filters, memory cards, batteries… Organizing everything correctly in your backpack will not only prevent you from losing something, but you will also avoid damaging it.

Any accessory must be within reach of your hand and easily accessible, in order to act quickly. No matter what the circumstance, a well-organized backpack will prevent stressful situations. There is nothing worse than wasting valuable time looking for an accessory, or worse still, looking for something you still don’t know you’ve lost.

Ultimately, you will have no choice. Over time, your equipment will grow and you may find it difficult to find a place in the same backpack in which you previously had plenty of space. You will have no choice but to “play Tetris” with all your accessories and find the combination that allows you to store everything correctly.

Get used to doing it from the beginning and you will avoid many headaches. An organized photographer is an efficient photographer!

Conclusion:

Over time I have learned from my mistakes and developed these 7 habits to improve my chances of success, while making the experience more enjoyable and less stressful, especially in situations where I need to react quickly.

Trust me when I tell you that most of these habits I learned the hard way. Landscape photography should be a relaxing activity, taking you away from daily stress. Acquiring these habits will not only make the experience more enjoyable, but will help you focus on the creative aspects and capture unique images.

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Compatible on all devices (Windows, Android, iOS), and the free Lightoom Mobile app, Lightroom Classic and ACR.

What Camera do I need for Landscape Photography?

Each camera is a world, and choosing the one that best suits you is not an easy task. Learn about all the features and functionality that make a camera ideal for landscape photography.


The 3 Essential Lenses for Landscape Photography

As a landscape photographer, lenses are possibly the most important items in your kit. Discover which are the 3 essentials, and what characteristics or not, you should look for to invest your money…


7 essential habits to improve as a landscape photographer

All successful photographers share certain habits in common. Adopt these 7 essential habits to boost your effectiveness and increase your chances of capturing memorable images.